Christopher K. Ho | Confucianism, White Privilege, and Art Dads

The brilliant and incisive Christopher K. Ho got a great write up for his solo show Grown Up Art in Hyperallergic! 

Danni Shen writes--

"In 2012, New York-based artist and curator Christopher K. Ho wrote the essay “The Clinton Crew: Privileged White Art,” describing the aesthetic sensibility and political shortcomings of Brooklyn-based artists who grew up in the United States during the 1990s. “The Clinton Crew,” Ho claims, replaced “politics” — the guidepost of much art of the ‘60s and ‘70s — with the subtler “ethics.” Four year later, Grown Up Art, Ho’s solo show at Present Co., begins with these follow-up questions: Can the Clinton Crew, and artists today, re-envision political art for the contemporary moment, beyond what Ho calls “the long shadow of 1968”? What happens when members of the Clinton Crew grow up, and have children?

Grown Up Art looks to pragmatism as an alternative term to consider. For example, the pragmatism of parenthood becomes a context for being an artist as well as a responsible subject."

Christopher K. Ho, “Institution” (installation view) (2016), table with dry-erase drawings, colored glass, copper foil, palladium leaf, 24” x 30” x 34” (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

Christopher K. Ho, “Institution” (installation view) (2016), table with dry-erase drawings, colored glass, copper foil, palladium leaf, 24” x 30” x 34” (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

Read the rest of the article at Hyperallergic

Christopher K. Ho | Grown Up Art

Christopher K. Ho
Grown Up Art
at Present Co. gallery, 254 Johnson Ave, Brooklyn NY 11206
May 13 - June 26, 2016
Opening Reception: Friday, May 13 (6-9pm)

                                      Christopher K. Ho, Art Dads, 2016.

                                      Christopher K. Ho, Art Dads, 2016.

 

Christopher K. Ho, friend and BFP Creative artist, has a solo show of his work opening this Friday, May 13th, at our neighboring Bushwick gallery, Present Co.! We hope you'll stop by to see Christopher's wonderful and intelligent work on display.

Visit Present Co.'s website here.

From the gallery's show announcement:

Present Company is pleased to announce an exhibition by Hong Kong-born, New York-based artist Christopher K. Ho. This will be his first show at the gallery, and his first solo presentation in New York since 2013.

Grown Up Art expands Ho’s decades-long sociological investigation of the artworld. With wit, passion, and acute sensitivity, the artist has in previous exhibitions mulled over white privilege, regional painting, Bushwick abstraction, and the fading legacy of 1968. In Grown Up Art, Ho explores how having children can affect, and underpin, a political art practice. Can being a positive role model—a parent, a mentor, a teacher—be as effective as negative critique or punkish rebellion? 

Joseph as Model, a six-channel video, presents Jesus’ foster father as a modest patriarch who embraces playing a supporting role. The video weaves together high and low culture (from Harold Bloom’s The Anxiety of Influence to the movie Ender’s Game); includes portraits of friends who are “art dads” (artists who are fathers); revisits values from Ho’s Chinese upbringing such as hard work, discipline, and pragmatism; and reflects on being a 43-year-old artist whose window to fulfill conventional notions of youthful genius long ago closed.

Eight stained glass sculptures comprise Institution, Grown Up Art’s centerpiece. Each marks a transition point from a Platonic cube to a snail’s spiral. The sculptures, handmade with copper foil and a variety of glass—iridescent, opalescent, English Muffle, Waterglass, mouth blown—sit atop a 24-foot angled dry-erase table covered in drawings by fourth graders from nearby PS 147 of institutions they envision leading when grown up. Underfoot is Order of the Snail, a carpet with an inlaid pattern of an uncoiled shell, and stacked glass cubes laser-etched with 3D models from the making of the stained glass.

I Endorse Patriarchy, a sound piece at the gallery’s entrance, features a Sino-British accented female voice reading a polemic. Passages include:

Because taking a single position can be as important as being open to other positions.
Because leaving a legacy is more generous and generative than maintaining community. 
Because the opposite of the school of resentment is not the school of respect, but rather the building of new schools.


Christopher K. Ho (b. 1974, Hong Kong) picks up threads of 1990s identity politics and weaves them into unlikely new patterns. His solo show Demoiselles d'Avignon (2013, Y Gallery, NY) refracted Western abstraction through the eyes of a future class of refined Chinese princelings, while Privileged White People (2013, Forever & Today, NY) examined the sensibility of artists who grew up during the affluent Clinton presidency. He has had solo exhibitions at Winkleman Gallery, NY (2010, 2008); FJORD, Philadelphia (2013); and Galeria EDS, Mexico City (2009). His work has been reviewed in the New York Times, Art in America, Modern Painters, Artforum, and ArtReview. He participated in the Incheon Biennial (2009), the Chinese Biennial Beijing (2008), and the Busan Bienniale (2008), and produced site-specific pieces for Storm King (2013) and the Cranbrook Art Museum (2011), where he was the 2010 Critical Studies Fellow. He teaches at VCU and RISD.

Craig Drennen | This Strange Game

Craig Drennen (whose solo show New Mistress vs. Old Athenians with BFP Creative can be seen here, and the old Brooklyn Fire Proof gallery on Richardson St. was the site of his first New York solo show in 2005), is included in the group show This Strange Game, curated by Michael Woody and Brigitte Mulholland. The show opens TODAY, Friday the 15th,  6:30-9:30 pm.

This Strange Game
Landmark Arts Building
547 W 27th Street, suite 210
January 15-31, 2016
Opening reception: Friday, January 15th, 6:30-9:30 pm

Artists include Rachel Beach, John Bjerklie, Matt Blackwell, Craig Drennen, Clinton King, Eleanor King, Joel Mellin, Nick Mullins, Caleb Nussear, John O'Connor, Peter Schenck, and Raphael Zollinger.

Christine Sciulli at Smack Mellon

Christine Sciulli's new solo exhibit ROIL opens this Saturday, January 9th, 5-8 pm, at Smack Mellon. Sciulli, who participated in BFP Creative's July 2015 show Luminary, has created "an immersive experience that transforms Smack Mellon's gallery space to reflect its historic function as a boiler house that created steam heat and energy for nearby buildings in the early 1900's. A multi channel video influenced by the generation of pressurized steam is projected onto sculptural fabric masses" (from the artist's release for the show).

Christine Sciulli
ROIL

Smack Mellon smackmellon.org
92 Plymouth St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Artists' Reception: Saturday, January 9, 5-8pm
*Special performance by Bohdan Hilash at 7pm
Exhibition Dates: January 9 - February 21, 2016

Also opening January 9th: Nona Faustine's White Shoes


Christine Sciulli
ROIL

- information from the artist, presented by Smack Mellon

“My most recent explorations have focused on the projection of plane geometries through various three dimensional networks to generate a dynamic mapping of solid geometries of light through space. In this installation, projected circles of white light expand and collapse through Smack Mellon’s cavernous space in a frenzy, which harkens back to the roiling steam that powered surrounding factories. 

Smack Mellon’s current home once belonged to Robert Gair, who patented his revolutionary design for a structurally sound three-dimensional lidded box folded from a single two-dimensional sheet of paper without adhesives in 1900. Industrialist Gair housed his widely varied paper product operations in several buildings concentrated in DUMBO. “Gairville” was fueled by tons of coal dropped through chutes carved out of the 4th and 5th floors of this former mill. Boilers in this vast hall superheated, churned and compressed water into hissing steam that pulsed through pipes and coursed into adjacent buildings supplying heat and energy.  Racing progress and rapidly expanding industrialization, made possible by the relatively simple kinetic expansion of water into a vapor that could provide so many uses, was the starting point for my immersive, site-specific installation, “ROIL.” My installation stretches through the industrial hall offering opportunities to inhabit it’s passages, caves, nooks, hubs and low overhangs which become clear to the viewer as dark adaptation takes place.” 

Christine Sciulli is a visual artist whose primary medium is projected light. Sciulli was selected for the American Academy of Arts and Letters 2014 Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts. Her installations have been shown in the Parrish Art Museum, South Fork Museum of Natural History, Frederieke Taylor Gallery, Edward Hopper House Art Center, and the Islip Art Museum where Janet Goleas described her installation to be “a quiet riot of controlled chaos.”Sciulli holds an Architectural Engineering degree from Penn State University, graduating as a Besal Scholar, as well as BFA and MFA degrees in Combined Media from Hunter College, where she was awarded the Esther Fish Perry Award, BFA merit award, and the Leutz/Reidel Travel Grant. Sciulli’s work is part of the New Museum’s Rhizome ArtBase (Rhizome.org). She is on the Artist Council of the Church Street School of Music and Art and has been adjunct faculty in the MFA Lighting Program at Parsons the New School for Design. In addition to her show at Smack Mellon, in 2016 Sciulli will present work at the Berkshire’s LABspace and will represent the United States at the 2016 Wadden Tide Festival in Denmark.

Luminary | BK Mag

Brooklyn Magazine asked its readers to recall their favorite art exhibitions of 2015--and BFP Creative's Luminary (co-curated by Oliver Warden and Hazel Lee Santino, featuring work by Melissa F. Clarke, CHiKA, dNASAb, Lindsay Packer, Christine Sciulli, Oliver Warden, Andrea Wolf and Natalia Zubko) came up twice! Lindsay Packer got additional mentions for her shows at neighboring galleries Soho20 and Present Company. Thank you!

http://www.bkmag.com/2015/12/03/best-art-exhibits-of-2015-the-dear-readers-edition/

Being Lost and Found in Bushwick | Arte Fuse

Olya Turcihin of Arte Fuse made it out to BFP Creative's first group show, Hrönir: Un-Lost Things. Copied below is her experience at the show! (All photos and text are the property of Olya Turcihin and Arte Fuse).


Some serious wall art that makes you smile. Left to right: “Doe” by Kristen Leonard, “Absens” by Monique Mantell, “Gilded Squirrel” by Really Large Numbers (Julia Oldham and Chad Stayrook)

Some serious wall art that makes you smile. Left to right: “Doe” by Kristen Leonard, “Absens” by Monique Mantell, “Gilded Squirrel” by Really Large Numbers (Julia Oldham and Chad Stayrook)

Some work at the show in BFP. “Border Control” by Nancy Baker

Some work at the show in BFP. “Border Control” by Nancy Baker

Instagram worthy moment at BFP. Work by Jaynie Crimmins

Instagram worthy moment at BFP. Work by Jaynie Crimmins

Trekked out to Bushwick last week to view Hrönir: Un-Lost Things curated by Hazel Lee Santino for BFP Creative… BFP Creative housed the show in their temporary storage galleries at Brooklyn Fire Proof. I was lost and disoriented at first, entering through the Brooklyn Fire Proof bar.  As I tried to find the gallery space, I thought to myself that a whiskey was in order on such a cold evening. A quick right out of the bar and then a left opened up to a large airy white space which housed some of the most creative art I have seen in a while. “Hrönir” are objects that, once lost, have been found–but they are duplicated and somehow affected by having been lost, or by having been found. ”The premise of losing something and then finding it again only to reveal that it has somehow changed, lent itself to experiencing the art by trying to figure out the story behind of each individual piece. Brilliant! In the end, I found myself sipping a whiskey and ultimately feeling quite satiated. Here’s to getting lost but now I’m found – CHEERS!

Participating Artists: Liz Atzberger, Nancy Baker, Franca Barone, James Bascara, Melinda Beck, Gregory Benton, Nathan Bond, Paul Brainard, Adam Brasil, Iain Burke, Richard Ray Chan, Beata Chrzanowska, Ehren Clodfelter, Jaynie Crimmins, William Crosby, Leigh Cunningham, Daniel Davidson, Travis DeMello, Burr Dodd, Kevin Doyle, Maureen Drennan, Jackson Falor-Ward, Lori Field, Ed Flanagan, Ryan Michael Ford, MaDora Frey, Linnéa Gad, Paul Gagner, Langdon Graves, Hunter Heckroth, Jen Hitchings, Chloe Isip, Jordin Isip, Simone Isip, Roberto Jamora, Nils Karsten, Tricia Keightley, Hannah Lee, Kristen Leonard, Rachel Levit, Melissa Ling, Kristen Liu-Wong, Monique Mantell, Eliot Markell, Maya Rose Meissner, Merz, Kit Mills, Kymia Nawabi, Jon Newman, Nora Normile, Brian O’Neill, Galia Offri, Julia Oldham + Chad Stayrook, HyunJin Alex Park, Helena Parriott, Maritsa Patrinos, Don Pablo Pedro, Chelsey Pettyjohn, Rachel Pontious, Monica Ramos, Julee Rieu, Scott Robinson, Marina Ross, Jonny Ruzzo, Hazel Lee Santino, Hiba Schahbaz, Rachel Schmidhofer, Kelsey Shwetz, Paula Searing, Andrew Smenos, Josie Stevenson, Christopher Stout, Ulrike Theusner, Jeanne Tremel, Michela Vinton, Oliver Warden, Frank Webster, Eric White, and James Yang.

(L-R) Artist Daniel Davidson with curator Hazel Lee Santino

(L-R) Artist Daniel Davidson with curator Hazel Lee Santino

Left to right (visible top row): “I Forgot to Remember to Forget” by Andrew Smenos, “16.20.14” by Tricia Keightley, “Heave” (diptych) by Ehren Clodfelter.

Left to right (visible top row): “I Forgot to Remember to Forget” by Andrew Smenos, “16.20.14” by Tricia Keightley, “Heave” (diptych) by Ehren Clodfelter.

“Ocean Beach” by Jordin Isip

“Ocean Beach” by Jordin Isip

Artist Monique Mantell at the opening.

Artist Monique Mantell at the opening.

(visible first three) left to right: “Untitled” by Melissa Ling, “How to Cope” by Hannah Lee, “Hugh” by Maureen Drennan. Pictured: artists Simone Isip and Jordin Isip.

(visible first three) left to right: “Untitled” by Melissa Ling, “How to Cope” by Hannah Lee, “Hugh” by Maureen Drennan. Pictured: artists Simone Isip and Jordin Isip.

The art crowd at BFP in Bushwick.

The art crowd at BFP in Bushwick.

“I Miss Nothing. Or Not.” by HyunJin Alex Park.

“I Miss Nothing. Or Not.” by HyunJin Alex Park.

(visible art, left to right) “Classical Hollywood Set” by Linnea Gad, “The Triump (Curiosity)” by Kelsey Shwetz. Pictured: artist Kristen Liu-Wong (left) and friend.

(visible art, left to right) “Classical Hollywood Set” by Linnea Gad, “The Triump (Curiosity)” by Kelsey Shwetz. Pictured: artist Kristen Liu-Wong (left) and friend.

http://artefuse.com/2014/11/24/hronir-un-lost-things-curated-by-hazel-lee-santino-at-brooklyn-fire-proof-123782/